Search
  • LaurenJanowiecki

BONDING



Everything you need to know about Bonding.


WHAT IS BONDING?


by Colegate.com

Original article & page course here.


What is it?

Bonding is the application of a tooth-colored composite resin (plastic) to repair a decayed, chipped, fractured or discolored tooth. Unlike veneers, which are manufactured in a laboratory and require a customized mold to achieve a proper fit, bonding can be done in a single visit. The procedure is called bonding because the material bonds to the tooth.


What it's Used for?

Bonding is among the easiest and least expensive of cosmetic dental procedures. The composite resin used in bonding can be shaped and polished to match the surrounding teeth. Most often, bonding is used for cosmetic purposes to improve the appearance of a discolored or chipped tooth. It also can be used to close spaces between teeth, to make teeth look longer or to change the shape or color of teeth.


Sometimes, bonding also is used as a cosmetic alternative to amalgam fillings, or to protect a portion of the tooth's root that has been exposed when gums recede.


Preparation


No preparation is needed for bonding. Anesthesia often is not necessary, unless the bonding is being used to fill a decayed tooth.


How it's Done

Your dentist will use a shade guide to select the composite resin color that will match the color of the tooth most closely.

Once your dentist has chosen the color, he or she will slightly abrade or etch the surface of the tooth to roughen it. The tooth will be coated lightly with a conditioning liquid, which helps the bonding material adhere.

When the tooth is prepared, your dentist will apply the tooth-colored, putty-like resin. The resin is molded and smoothed until it's the proper shape. Then the material is hardened with an ultraviolet light or laser.

After the bonding material hardens, your dentist will further trim and shape it. Then he or she will polish the material until it matches the sheen of the rest of the tooth surface.

It usually takes about 30 minutes to an hour to complete the procedure. If you're having more than one tooth done, you may need to schedule several visits.

Tea, coffee, cigarette smoke and other substances can stain the resin. To prevent or minimize stains, it's essential to avoid eating or drinking foods that can stain for the first 48 hours after any composite procedure. In addition, brush your teeth often and have them cleaned regularly by a dental hygienist.


Risks

The composite resin used in bonding isn't nearly as strong as a natural tooth. Biting your fingernails or chewing on ice or pens can chip the material. Bonding usually lasts several years before it needs to be repaired. How long it actually lasts depends on how much bonding was done and your oral habits.


When to Call a Professional

In the days after having the bonding done, call your dentist if you notice sharp edges on the bonded teeth, or your teeth feel strange or "off" when you bite down.

At any time, call your dentist if the bonding chips or pieces fall out.

©2001-2003 InteliHealth Inc. All rights reserved.

2/28/2004



COMPOSITE BONDING


by Tricia Mool via Colegate.com

Original article & page course here.


Composite resin bonding can be a fast, minimally invasive and inexpensive option for the beautiful smile you're looking for. But knowing what makes you a good candidate can help you determine if it's the right investment for you.


What Is Composite Bonding?


Composite bonding is a cosmetic technique wherein a type of dental material – in this case, composite resin – is shaped and molded on your teeth to give the appearance of straighter, whiter smile. It can be used as a cosmetic solution to chipped teeth, gapped teeth and staining in both teeth and fillings. Unlike porcelain veneer placement, which can take more than two visits, composite resin bonding can be completed in one appointment.


According to Everyday Health, the cost for bonding can range from about $300 to $600 per tooth for a simpler procedure, like a cavity filling. Although many dental insurance plans do not cover cosmetic bonding, it's good practice to ask whether they will cover a portion – especially if it's part of a medically necessary procedure, which some insurers acknowledge.


Whom Is Composite Bonding Right For?


Composite resin bonding isn't for everyone. If your smile is crooked as the result of an over- or underbite, this treatment won't serve to correct it. Instead, speak with your dentist to determine if more in-depth work is needed like adjusting your bite or any complex chips or gaps in your teeth. Bonding is primarily for those who seek a cosmetic solution for teeth that are otherwise healthy.


What Can You Expect During Your Visit?


Composite bonding is a safe and effective technique that was developed more than 50 years ago, and has been widely available for over three decades, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). The fillings and processes today are very efficient, making it easier for both you and your dentist.

The treatment itself often starts with the removal of some surface enamel, allowing the dentist to best shape the composite resin to your tooth, followed by the application of the bonding agent. Your dentist will then add the composite resin, cure it with a special light and finish by polishing your teeth. Because the process involves a high level of technique for a natural mold and shape, it's best to work with a dentist who has experience and specialty in this area.


What Aftercare Is Needed?


With normal care, today's composite material is durable enough to last without regular attention; you won't need to seek out your dentist for special visits and upkeep. Nonetheless, make sure to keep your regular dental checkup and daily oral care a priority. Mouthwashes like Colgate Total® Gum Health, for instance, can improve gum strength by 45 percent for those who find their gumline tougher to maintain after bonding treatment. You should also avoid biting down on particularly hard foods, or ice, to prevent cracking.


If you're interested in achieving a brighter smile, composite resin bonding is a great option. Be sure to take care of your other oral necessities, first, to ensure your natural smile is healthy inside and out.


BEFORE, DURING, & AFTER


by Jae Curtis via Colegate.com

Original article & page course here.


That moment you realize you've chipped a tooth doesn't just cramp your smile; leaving it unchecked could cause pain. Luckily, tooth bonding is a simple and relatively comfortable procedure for those who need to restore broken or weakened teeth.

Compared to other cosmetic dental procedures, bonding is quick and offers long-lasting results. If you think it might be your answer to a smooth smile, here's what you can expect before, during and after your appointment.


Before:


Bonding is just one procedure through which a dentist can help you attain a better smile, but it's not your only option. The application works best on areas of the mouth with low bite pressure, like your front teeth, and those that need minor repair. When the damage is more severe or in an area of high bite pressure, your dentist may suggest a veneer or crown – both of which are ideal for extensive damage or molar restoration, according to Cleveland Clinic. Your dentist can help you choose the treatment that's right for you.


During:


Tooth bonding applies a resin that is then molded and hardened to fill in cracks or chips present in your teeth. It is virtually indistinguishable from your natural enamel, but before your dentist can begin his or her handiwork, the tooth must first be roughened so the resin material can properly adhere. This is typically done with a dremel-like tool, which can cause some sensitivity. Depending on the severity of the damage, your dentist may therefore opt to numb the area in which he is working to ensure your comfort.


A dental assistant often uses this time to mix the resin to match your natural teeth color. After the tooth surface has been roughened, this resin is applied and carefully shaped. A special light is then used to harden the resin, and you'll probably hear your dentist ask you to bite down several times to indicate if you feel excess resin that still needs smoothing away. This process is repeated until your tooth bonding is perfect.


After:


Don't be surprised if your teeth feel a little strange after bonding; mouths are very sensitive to changes, and your tooth might feel wider with the addition of a resin. Over time it will bother you less.

Bonding may not last as long as veneers, but you should easily enjoy up to a decade of wear depending on the bite area and how you treat the tooth that was restored. Keep in mind bonding doesn't resist stains as well as crowns or veneers, and doesn't respond to whitening treatments. Your best bet is to follow a healthy oral hygiene routine to keep your bonding looking bright, including brushing with an all-purpose toothpaste like Colgate TotalSF Advanced Deep Clean. To ensure the most years of wear, avoid things that can crack the bonded material, such as using your teeth to open food wrappers.


Tooth bonding is a great option for many small but vital repairs. An afternoon in the dentist's office and a little patience on your part could mean beautifying areas of your smile that cause you to feel self-conscious.


Not everyone is a candidate for whitening. Bleaching is not recommended if you have tooth-colored fillings, crowns, caps or bonding in your front teeth — the bleach will not change the color of these materials, making them stand out in your newly whitened smile. In these cases, you may want to investigate other options, like veneers or bonding.


BONDING VS VENEERS



Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain or plastic glued to the front of your teeth. For teeth that are severely discolored, chipped or misshapen, they create a durable and pleasing smile. Veneers are difficult to stain, making them popular for people seeking a perfect smile.

There are two types of veneers:


Porcelain (indirect) veneers, which must first be created to fit your teeth in a dental laboratory and require two visits to the dentist. Porcelain veneers cost between $900-$2,500 per tooth and last from 10 to 15 years or more


Composite (direct) veneers, in which enamel is bonded to your tooth in a single visit. Composite veneers cost significantly less, around $250 per tooth, but only last five to seven years




Bonding uses composite resin to restore chipped or broken teeth, fill in gaps and reshape or recolor your smile. After applying a very mild etching solution that slightly roughs the surface of your teeth and permits the bonding material to adhere, your dentist applies the resin and sculpts, colors and shapes it to provide a pleasing result. A high-intensity light hardens the material, which is then finely polished.


Many people choose bonding over silver fillings because it looks more natural — the material can be matched to your natural tooth colorThe disadvantages of bonding versus silver fillings are that they cost more (from $300-$600 per tooth), and because it is porous, smokers will find that it yellows


Your dentist can tell you if you are a good candidate for veneers or bonding.


Copyright © 2002, 2003 Colgate-Palmolive Company. All rights reserved.


This article is intended to promote understanding of and knowledge about general oral health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment.

47 views
lending_club_logo.png

© 2018 THOMAS C. VOLCK D.D.S 

  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • Grey LinkedIn Icon
  • Grey Pinterest Icon
  • Grey YouTube Icon

WEBSITE BY LAUREN @ TYLTWEBDEVELOPMENT.COM